What's Wrong with the 6.0L OEM Oil Cooler?



The Ford 6.0L Power Stroke diesel has earned quite a reputation. This reputation is hampered by some expensive failures, including:

  • EGR Cooler Rupture/Leaking
  • Engine Oil Temperature overheating
  • Blown Head Gasket
  • Turbo Failure
  • Fuel Injector Failure
  • High-Pressure Oil Pump Failure

All of these failures have a common thread - the OEM Engine Oil Cooler

The problem with the engine oil cooler arises when the coolant flows through the tight passageways of the engine oil cooler (see picture). These pathways are so small that they catch and stop any large particles suspended in the coolant, blocking the channel. While the mileage varies, it typically takes about 50,000 miles before the coolant can no longer flow through the cooler on its way to the EGR cooler, leaving less and less coolant flow for your engine oil cooler AND for your EGR cooler.

A plugged up engine oil cooler can lead to a ruptured EGR cooler, overheated engine oil, overheated fuel injectors, loss of coolant, ruptured engine oil cooler and blown head gaskets.


See the problem with the OEM Oil Cooler?

Here is a close-up view of the OEM oil cooler.  The tall levels are for the oil to pass through, and the narrow levels are the coolant pathways.  Look carefully at the coolant pathways and you will see that there is a residue left behind that plugs the oil cooler over time.

As these pathways become plugged, it limits the efficacy of the OEM oil cooler.  This means hotter, thinner oil running through your 6.0L engine.  This hotter, thinner oil does not lubricate as well nor does it keep components as cool as it could.

What components are affected?  Well... all the components that are dependent on engine oil... including fuel injectors, turbo, high-pressure oil pump, lifters, cam, etc.

Learn about the OEM and BulletProof Engine Oil Coolers

Problems with the OEM Oil Cooler
BulletProof vs. OEM Oil Cooler

Upgrade to the patented BulletProof Oil Cooler! BUY NOW